Drifting with purpose

I can see you...

3 notes

Using a different test, Estes asked everyone to answer every question. Both the men and the women got 80 percent right, suggesting identical ability levels. He then tested the students again and asked them, after each question, to report their confidence in their answer. Just having to think about whether they felt certain of their answer changed their ability to do well. The women’s scores dipped to 75 percent, while the men’s jumped to 93. One little nudge asking women how sure they are about something rattles their world, while the same gesture reminds men that they’re terrific.

The Confidence Gap, a really interesting article about confidence, how it can be manipulated, and how it holds women back in the workplace (x).

Thanks drinkthehalo for showing me this.

Filed under women men feminism confidence workplace

5,965 notes

wetheurban:

ART: B E A U T Y by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro

Rino Stefano Tagliafierro brought back the expressive force of gestures of beauty that he springs from the immobility of canvas, animating a sentiment lost to the fixedness masterpieces.

It almost seems as if we could walk through the untouched nature and watch the angels sing their chorus.

Read More

This is so breathtakingly unusual that I just absolutely want it on my blog.

(via antihero)

Filed under art amazing Rino Stefano Tagliafierro

1 note

When I read or hear people refer to the Winter Soldier as the “bad guy”/”villain”, I always wonder if we watched the same movie. Like, did they miss Alexander Pierce and all the Hydra people? I didn’t think WS was bad even once, his eyes were always sad, even after blowing up stuff.

Filed under Winter Soldier Bucky Barnes Captain America villains

5,149 notes

stardust-rain:

bucky + the shield

(via vstahl)

Such emotional tags, but they don’t really make sense. The shield didn’t “kill him the first time and save him the second time”. It actually saved him the first time, and didn’t do anything one way or the other the second. In that gif you can clearly see that if it weren’t for the shield, the robot guy would have fired right at Bucky and blown him to pieces on the spot —> no Winter Soldier for us.

And in the second gif set it’s just “bam! caught the shield. betcha didn’t expect that, did you?” and nothing more. It’s basically a really cool shot (my favourite of the movie, on par with the Hulk punching the metal centipede in The Avengers.)

(Source: kirknspock, via red-rose26)

Filed under Winter Soldier Bucky Barnes Captain America Captain America shield

3 notes

Agatha Christie quotes

"Mess! That’s what’s the matter with the world nowadays. Too much mess. And too much fine language. The fine language helps to conceal the mess. Like a highly flavoured sauce concealing the fact that the fish underneath it is none of the best!"

— Four and Twenty Blackbirds

Without the least warning the door flew open, and a whirlwind in human form invaded out privacy, bringing with her a swirl of sables (it was as cold as only and English June day can be) and a hat rampant with slaughtered ospreys. Countess Vera Rossakoff was a somewhat disturbing personality.

— The Double Clue

Here’s Jimmy Allenson. Such a nice boy. He saved my life in Egypt last winter — I was so bored, you know.

— The Shadow on the Glass

The Scotts are doing the turtle dove stunt, two required, not three, Porter’s devouring the Field, and I’ve been in mortal danger of being entertained by my hostess.

— The Shadow on the Glass

You see, I’ve known a good many young men, and these emotional scenes upset them very much - especially the dark nervous types like Martin Wylde. Women, now, can go through a scene like that, and feel positively better for it afterward, with all their wits about them. It acts like a safety valve for them, steadies their nerves down and all that.

— The Sign in the Sky

A disarming young man, thought Poirot — not so young, either, for there was gray hair at the temples and lines in the forehead. It was the voice and manner that gave the impression of boyishness.

— The Second Gong

Filed under Agatha Christie Hercule Poirot Harley Quinn detective stories good quotes

2 notes

Three-handed Virgin Mary
Yesterday I was at the Ukrainian Museum and saw this icon. There was no explanation why she had three hands, and it mystified me, because I’d never seen or heard of anything like this before. The plaque said only the title, that it was from the mid-XIX century, the Cherkasy region of Central Ukraine. Wood, oil, 31x35 cm, on loan from Lidia Lykach. That’s it.
Today, I was at the Cloisters. I still hadn’t had a chance to look up this icon, but since I was surrounded by religious art, I decided to ask someone who worked there about it. She didn’t know, but word got out, and we were approached by a few other museum workers/researchers to see this picture. And none of them knew anything about it.
I thought this was a big mystery until I got home to google. Turns out the Three-handed Virgin Mary, or Troeruchitsa, is very popular in the Eastern/Greek Orthodox Church. Her story was started in 717, got to Russia in 1661, and subsequently became very popular there as well.

Three-handed Virgin Mary

Yesterday I was at the Ukrainian Museum and saw this icon. There was no explanation why she had three hands, and it mystified me, because I’d never seen or heard of anything like this before. The plaque said only the title, that it was from the mid-XIX century, the Cherkasy region of Central Ukraine. Wood, oil, 31x35 cm, on loan from Lidia Lykach. That’s it.

Today, I was at the Cloisters. I still hadn’t had a chance to look up this icon, but since I was surrounded by religious art, I decided to ask someone who worked there about it. She didn’t know, but word got out, and we were approached by a few other museum workers/researchers to see this picture. And none of them knew anything about it.

I thought this was a big mystery until I got home to google. Turns out the Three-handed Virgin Mary, or Troeruchitsa, is very popular in the Eastern/Greek Orthodox Church. Her story was started in 717, got to Russia in 1661, and subsequently became very popular there as well.

Filed under religious art iconography Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church Ukraine